Category: Out in the Black

It's A Shame that John Bad Mutha Shut Yo Mouth Didn't Discover This Comet

It's A Shame that John Bad Mutha Shut Yo Mouth Didn't Discover This Comet

| December 16, 2011 | Reply

Some comets hide debris in their long tails. Comet Lovejoy hides a fist and a leaping spin-kick.

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The Delivery Presents – To the Moon, Listeners!

The Delivery Presents – To the Moon, Listeners!

| December 6, 2011 | Reply

This week, we lurn how skulls teach reel gud! Also, I let my inner science geek out to play for a while and reveal why I miss my toy rocket.

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Fifty Years in Space, But Will We See More?

Fifty Years in Space, But Will We See More?

| April 12, 2011 | Reply

I find it amazing that the entire history of manned spaceflight can very nearly fit within my own lifetime. Today marks two important anniversaries in mankind’s attempt to explore the vast universe outside our own world. Rand Simberg gives us the details. Tomorrow will be the fiftieth anniversary of the first time a human orbited the […]

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NASA's Idea of Winning the Future is Less than Inspiring

NASA's Idea of Winning the Future is Less than Inspiring

| February 14, 2011 | Reply

Remember when the people who ran NASA aspired to great things, like putting men on the moon and exploring the vasty blackness of our final frontier? These days, it takes much less to get then excited. Witness the headline of today’s big press release: NASA Announces Plan To Win The Future With Fiscal Year 2012 […]

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The Moon Plays Peek-A-Boo

The Moon Plays Peek-A-Boo

| December 21, 2010 | Reply

My plan last night was to wake up not long before 3 AM and catch a good chunk of the lunar eclipse, past totality (which is not terribly exciting viewing) into the unveiling of the moon from the Earth’s shadow (which is incredibly cool). Alas, I also saw Tron: Legacy earlier in the evening and […]

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Don’t Swagger, NASA. You Haven’t Earned It Yet.

Don’t Swagger, NASA. You Haven’t Earned It Yet.

| December 20, 2010 | 1 Reply

I like to think I’m more plugged in to science news than the average person, but I don’t think I’m plugged in so much that I believe that NASA had this glorious a year. NASA in 2010 set a new course for human spaceflight, helped rewrite science textbooks, redefined our understanding of Earth’s nearest celestial […]

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Big NASA Announcement Tomorrow; Alien Invasion Fleet Takes Parking Orbit

Big NASA Announcement Tomorrow; Alien Invasion Fleet Takes Parking Orbit

| December 1, 2010 | 1 Reply

Hmmm… WASHINGTON — NASA will hold a news conference at 2 p.m. EST on Thursday, Dec. 2, to discuss an astrobiology finding that will impact the search for evidence of extraterrestrial life. Astrobiology is the study of the origin, evolution, distribution and future of life in the universe. The news conference will be held at […]

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We Live in a Beautiful Universe, Don’t We?

We Live in a Beautiful Universe, Don’t We?

| November 4, 2010 | Reply

This is simply stunning video. I can not imagine how much time and effort went into making it but I’m certainly glad it’s here. Farrell added a few details about where he took the photographs used in the video and how he put it all together. Check it out.

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“What Did You Do In School Today?” “Not Much. Crashed a Satellite”

“What Did You Do In School Today?” “Not Much. Crashed a Satellite”

| September 7, 2010 | 1 Reply

I never got to do anything this cool in my college days. When a NASA satellite met its doom in a fiery blaze in Earth’s atmosphere after a seven-year mission, a bunch of college students were at the controls. But these students didn’t hack into NASA to take the satellite for a destructive joyride — […]

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Cassini Should Watch Out for Fremen

Cassini Should Watch Out for Fremen

| July 29, 2010 | 2 Replies

The spice must flow! Gusty winds that blow in reverse of prevailing weather on Saturn’s largest moon Titan appear to shape some of the moon’s odd equatorial sand dunes, a new study finds. Huge dunes of tiny particles of carbon cover more than 20 percent of Titan’s surface. A particular band of these dunes — within […]

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