Gas Prices Falling Like…a Really Heavy Thing

| August 19, 2008 | 5 Replies

I’ve seen way to many metaphors for falling gas prices to come up with one of my own. Sorry.

Surely you been noticing the falling gasoline prices. I certainly have and so has Reuters, which notes that gas prices are at the lowest they’ve been since the middle of May. The article attributes that to less domestic demand and lower crude oil prices. Not mentioned is the all-out press that the President and House Republicans have put on increasing our domestic production, which has had to have a large effect on the oil futures market. It’s still no coincidence that oil prices started falling just two days after the President rescinded the Executive Order banning offshore drilling. Not long thereafter, Republicans in Congress pressed a vacationing Nancy Pelosi to come back and vote on their domestic drilling bill.

She still hasn’t come back, by the way. I guess your “pain at the pump” doesn’t matter much to her.

Meanwhile, the New York Times editorial board isn’t spending a lot of time reading its own news section. It’s been an article of faith for MSM outlets like the Times to say that the piddling amount of oil they think we might get from offshore drilling and ANWR wouldn’t have much of an effect on gas prices. Yet it appears that a piddling amount of gas that we haven’t been getting for over a year is keeping gas prices high.


Is basic economics really that hard or is the left just obdurate about this on purpose? Look, I can understand that you might not want us to drill more oil for a myriad of perfectly valid reasons. You may have environmental concerns that you want ironed out first. You may believe that we need a reason to press harder for alternative sources of energy and that high oil prices are a good external motivator toward that goal. I, and most conservatives, are willing to have those discussions. What I am asking is that folks like the Times editorial board just be honest about it. Stop muddying up the discussion with bogus arguments, ad hominem attacks, and partisan talking points designed to blunt discussion. Let’s actually have a discussion about this subject, rationally and calmly. Let us, for a change, find out what the other side really wants instead of assuming that one side is in the pockets of oil companies and are motivated by greed or the other side is beholden to the Luddite environmentalists and wants to drive us all back to a horse and buggy economy. We may find that some folks in the discussion really are motivated by those things, but all of us are not.

So let’s talk. Seriously. Rationally. Using stuff we know that works and building from there.

Category: General

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